News

Microbiota in pancreatic health and disease

The next frontier in microbiome research Diseases intrinsic to the pancreas such as pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and type 1 diabetes mellitus impart substantial health and financial burdens on society but identification of novel mechanisms contributing to these...

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Manipulating the Human Microbiome to Manage Disease

More than a decade after the launch of the Human Microbiome Project, research in this field has grown exponentially, with studies associating microbial states or species with disorders including novel infectious etiologies and complex human disease. Scientists are...

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Milestones in gut microbiome science in 2019

The human microbiome has not only captured the attention of scientists, but also of health professionals and the lay press. Although initial studies focused on characterizing the intestinal microbiome in the context of health and disease and the influence of...

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Intestinal microbiota and colorectal carcinoma

Implications for pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy  Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers and leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In recent years, there has been a growing realization that lifestyle plays a major role...

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Gut microbiota imbalance promotes the onset of colorectal cancer

The gastroenterology team at Henri-Mondor AP-HP Hospital and University Paris-Est Créteil, led by Professor Iradj Sobhani, together with teams from Inserm and the Institut Pasteur Molecular Microbial Pathogenesis Unit (U1202), led by Professor Philippe Sansonetti...

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Chemotherapy-induced neuroinflammation

Chemotherapy-induced neuroinflammation is associated with disrupted colonic and bacterial homeostasis in female mice Chemotherapy treatment negatively affects the nervous and immune systems and alters gastrointestinal function and microbial composition. Outside of the...

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A possible gut-brain connection to ‘chemo brain’

Scientists looking for evidence of bowel involvement in cognitive and mood problems related to chemotherapy treatment are testing their theories with the help of an unpleasant rodent habit: eating feces. Because chemotherapy is very hard for the digestive system and...

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Survive in the human gut, bacteria need genetic ‘passcode’

The bacteria that live in people's intestines pump toxins to deter microbial intruders. But each person's intestine comes with its own set of toxins: individualized "access code" microbes must resolve to survive, scientists report October 30, 2019, in the journal...

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